ABOUT THE REVIEW ISSUES EDITORIAL BOARD SYMPOSIUM SUBSCRIPTIONS SUBMISSIONS CONTACT US

2012 SYMPOSIUM

“Affirmative Action in Higher Education: An Early Sunset?”

Thursday, March 1, 2012
5:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Rutgers School of Law-Newark 
Center for Law and Justice          
123 Washington Street 
Newark, New Jersey 07102


The future of affirmative action in higher education will be discussed by a panel of legal experts and distinguished speakers at the Rutgers Race & the Law Review symposium to be held at Rutgers School of Law–Newark on Thursday, March 1, 2012 from 5:00 – 8:30 pm. CLE credit is available for the symposium, which is co-sponsored by the Institute for Professional Education.

The U.S. Supreme Court has recently been petitioned to hear Fisher v. University of Texas, which portends a dramatic shift in the law. This case may change ― if not eliminate ― affirmative action in higher education as it now exists. This potential shift has practical significance for lawyers, including those who practice in higher education. The discussion by distinguished speakers who have been at the forefront of the issue will include:

  • Practical Considerations of Affirmative Action Cases on Universities and Higher Education
  • Litigation Strategies for Affirmative Action
  • Litigation Strategies Against Affirmative Action

Rutgers Race & the Law Review, established in 1996, is the second journal in the nation to focus on the broad spectrum of multi–cultural issues. It addresses the concerns of people of color and covers various types of political ideologies, philosophies, and religions. Of special interest are treaties, agreements, and laws promulgated among different countries and the impact they have on diverse people.

The Institute for Professional Education offers high-quality, reasonably–priced continuing legal education programs to members of the bar in convenient locations.

Pre-registration for “Affirmative Action in Higher Education: An Early Sunset?” is required at http://www.rutgerscle.com/. The program will provide 2.5 CLE credit hours (NJ and NY) or 2.0 credit hours (PA). Registration is free for those not seeking CLE credit and $75 for those who are. For questions pertaining to CLE credit hours please contact Rutgers Institute for Professional Education at 973.353.5928 or by email at info@IPE.rutgers.edu.

  Speakers:
 

Jonathan Alger, Senior Vice President and General Counsel, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey:   Mr. Alger handles affirmative action issues as counsel to Rutgers University. Additionally, prior to coming to Rutgers, he served as Assistant General Counsel at the University of Michigan, where he helped coordinate the U.S. Supreme Court litigation for Grutter v Bollinger and Gratz v Bollinger.

Lee C. Bollinger, President, Columbia University:   A prominent advocate of affirmative action, President Bollinger played a leading role in the twin Supreme Court cases—Grutter v Bollinger and Gratz v Bollinger—that upheld and clarified the importance of diversity as a compelling justification for affirmative action in higher education. A leading First Amendment scholar, he is widely published on freedom of speech and press, and currently serves on the faculty of Columbia Law School. 

Roger Clegg, President and General Counsel, Center for Equal Opportunity: Mr. Clegg formerly served as Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights in the Reagan and Bush administrations.   In his work at the Center, he focuses on issues arising from implementation of the civil rights laws ― including the regulatory impact on business and affirmative action in higher education.

Paul L. Tractenberg, Board of Governors Distinguished Service Professor and Alfred C. Clapp Distinguished Public Service Professor of Law, Rutgers School of Law–Newark:   Professor Tractenberg earned his B.A. from Wesleyan and his J.D. from the University of Michigan, where he was associate editor of the Law Review. He is involved in a number of landmark constitutional cases about public education, especially Abbott v. Burke, which New Jersey judges and lawyers voted overwhelmingly the most important state court decision of the 20th century.

Brandon Paradise, Associate Professor of Law, Rutgers School of Law–Newark:  Moderator; Professor Paradise earned his B.A. from the University of Southern California, where he studied economics and philosophy, and a J.D. from Yale Law School, where he served as an editor of the Yale Journal of International Law. His work-in-progress is entitled “Cultural Racism in the Private Sector and Coerced Biculturalism.”


Please RSVP by Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at http://www.rutgerscle.com/cle_reg.php?event_id=51. If you have any questions please contact Rutgers Race & the Law Review at racelawreview@gmail.com.



 


SPONSORED BY

The Association of Black Law Students
The Student Publishing Initiative
The Federalist Society

TELL US YOU'LL ATTEND
To RSVP click here
HOW TO GET TO RUTGERS
Directions
PAST SYMPOSIA
See topics and speakers at previous symposia.
COPYRIGHT 2014 RUTGERS RACE & THE LAW REVIEW | CONTACT US